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Basic Beginners Guide to Herb Gardening

ElizabethC

New Member
Messages
1
Even beginners can grow excellent herbs which are simple to take care of. Give them a bit of sun, well-draining soil and a touch of compost or fertilizer and you have a healthy herb garden prepared right outside your door.

You may also grow herbs without a garden. Many of them will grow happily in a pot although nearly all them prefer to be in the earth if you've got the space. The huge key to successful herb gardening is location. I don't mean that you've got to live in the best part of town - you just need to plant the herbs in the perfect place in the garden.

You could even put your herbs someplace they'll get dappled light through the leaves of a tree. Rosemary, Mint, Sage, Oregano, Marjoram, Basil, Tarragon, Basil and Savory will grow a few feet for each plant. Chives, Cilantro, Parsley and Dill will grow just one foot each. Careful soil preparation is important for growing healthy herbs. Dig over the ground with a garden tool which enables the water to drain through in addition to creating space for the roots to reach down deep into the ground. If you don't do this correctly your plants may not thrive. You're nearly ready to plant your herbs. Be sure you get the strongest, healthiest herb plants at the nursery and don't let the ground to dry out.

As they grow some plants grow new leaves out from their center (Parsley does this) in which case it might be essential to remove old, dead branches to permit new development from the plant. Herb gardening is actually quite simple and incredibly rewarding. From the garden to the kitchen in only a few snips – try it for a lovely garden and tasty food.
 

Rahab222

Well-Known Member
Messages
353
Planting Zone
9B
All my herbs flower too quickly, like they are at the end of their life-cycle. Even though I start with small plants - especially my cilantro. How do I keep this from happening and the herb plant playing out too quickly? I grow herbs, but don't know what to do with most of them. I love the scent of them in the garden when I brush against them.
 

ErnieCopp

Well-Known Member
Messages
877
Location
Vista, CA San Diego County
Planting Zone
9B
Many years ago i had a traumatic experience with herbs, so now what little cooking i do, i mostly rely on Herbs de Provence.

I was single and learning to cook, so i decided to do a butterflied leg of lamb to take to the ladies at the office. I loved the smell of rosemary, so i used some of that. When i served it, one of the ladies took a bite, and said, "Hmm, Rosemary had a little lamb".

So, i do have a big beautiful Rosemary bush, and like to drag my hand through it for the aroma, but do not use much of it anymore.

Ernie
 

wolffman

Well-Known Member
Messages
718
Location
Texas, Gulf Coast
Planting Zone
9
All my herbs flower too quickly, like they are at the end of their life-cycle. Even though I start with small plants - especially my cilantro. How do I keep this from happening and the herb plant playing out too quickly? I grow herbs, but don't know what to do with most of them. I love the scent of them in the garden when I brush against them.
As soon as the flowers appear, trim them back. We just use regular hedge shears and snip away all the flowers as soon as they start to appear. This will extend the plant for quite a bit longer, but there's nothing I know of that will stop it from flowering too early.
 

ErnieCopp

Well-Known Member
Messages
877
Location
Vista, CA San Diego County
Planting Zone
9B
You might plant a Rosemary to one side out of the way, leave it as a perennial, and it will grow large. I deliberately brush up against mine just to release the smells.
On the others, you might stagger the planting dates, to extend the good smelling times.
Ernie
 
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